Attorney General: Consumer Issues
Consumer Issues

Consumer Credit
 FORECLOSURE PREVENTION/LOAN MODIFICATION ASSISTANCE
  There are many resources available to consumers attempting to achieve loan modifications and avoid foreclosure.
 
 How to Protect Your Privacy
  The Federal Trade Commission has developed a Privacy Page on its Web site to show consumers how to protect their personal information from public access. The page explains how to protect the privacy of your personal information.
 
 Credit Accountability, Responsibility, and Disclosure (“CARD”) Act
  Many of the CARD Act’s consumer protection provisions became effective on February 22, 2010...
 
 Mortgage Issues
  Mortgage related information
 
 How to Correct Mistakes In Your Credit Report
  Review your credit report for any mistakes or information more than seven years old (10 years for bankruptcy). If you don't understand something, ask. The credit bureau is required by law to explain your report to you. If there are mistakes, you can take the following actions:
 
 Credit Reporting Laws
  Have you ever had difficulty getting your credit report or disagreed with the information on the report? Thanks to a new law, your rights to obtain your credit report and to correct inaccurate information are now significantly stronger .
 
 How to Spot Credit Repair Scams and Correct Your Credit History Yourself
  There's a brisk business among so-called "credit repair" companies that charge from $50 to more than $1,000 to "fix" your credit report. In many cases, these outfits take your money and do little or nothing to improve your credit report. Often, they just vanish.
 
 Spotting Credit Repair Scams
  If you are tempted to contact a credit repair company for help, use considerable caution. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and a number of state Attorneys General have sued credit repair companies for falsely promising to remove bad information from credit reports. Consider the following:
 
 More Credit Related Scams
  "Gold" or "Platinum" Cards - Beware of promotions for "gold" or "platinum" cards that promise to get you credit and build your credit rating even if your credit history is poor. Checking Account Scams - One of the latest scams making the rounds typically begins with a postcard advertising easy credit approval or low credit card interest rates.
 
 What's In Your Credit Report
  If you're having trouble getting credit, try checking your credit report yourself. The credit report tells how you've managed your credit in the past. Companies examine your credit report before deciding whether to give you credit. When a company denies your request for credit because of your credit report, it must tell you so and identify the bureau that supplied the report.